SEE YOU IN A YEAR’S TIME!

30/09/2016, Saint-Tropez (FRA,83), Voiles de Saint-Tropez 2016, Day 5

And so the racing concludes for almost 4,000 sailors competing in this exceptional, good-humoured edition of Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez 2016, evidently somewhat overawed by so much light, so many exciting races and so much fun both on land and on the water. In the gentle atmosphere of an autumn Sunday, the prize-giving ceremony traditionally organised in the Citadel off Saint Tropez was one last moment of sharing, full of the promise of enchanting tomorrows at Les Voiles, in contact with the legendary yachts and the dazzling bay setting. As highlighted by André Beaufils, the happy President of the Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez, organiser of the event, it is the sailors, skippers and owners, who make the event what it is today, and with every passing edition, they perpetuate the dream of the creative visionaries from some 35 years ago at the Nioulargue.

 Quotes from the Dock:

André Beaufils, President of the Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez

“It’s an edition that will go down in the annals, in terms of the weather of course, which has been absolutely fantastic, as well in terms of the constraints imposed this year with the work on the Harbour Master’s Office, and the subsequent re-siting of Les Voiles’ race village, not to mention the imperatives linked to security. We can no longer organise such an event in a carefree manner. I’m delighted with this past week, as are all the competitors. That’s the important thing. Our partners have declared themselves to be happy too. The Town of Saint Tropez has got to enjoy some lovely encounters, particularly with Tahiti’s presence. The show on the water has been fabulous and the media have been able to work in optimum conditions. All the positive feedback is a great reward for all our volunteers. The village was also a crowd-pleaser with its trompe l’oeil windows. We’ll hang onto the concept whilst making it wider for next year. Our Rolex partner will be back with its hospitality area so we’ll rediscover our usual entrance, but with some developments.

How can we do better? It’s not a question I ask myself. I don’t have a record to beat. We’ve attained a level of quality that is in close correlation with the event and we can modify things according to outside constraints. Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez, is a bit like a B.Y.O. party; you get what you put into it! There are no stakes to our races. That spirit must continue. We can allow ourselves a few excesses, a few moments of madness. It’s down to the competitors to create the crazy atmosphere.”

Georges Kohrel, President of the Race Committee

“This year, it would be hard to be more satisfied! What a superb week, with superb conditions and superb races! We haven’t enjoyed such conditions for a long time. The teams on the water know each other incredibly well. We make minor adjustments if necessary so as there are no gaps in the chain of skills. I have no concerns about the organisation of the three Race Committees for the Modern, Tradition and Wally yachts. It’s the skills of all our volunteers on the water that enable three race rounds and 300 boats to be managed simultaneously. The fine weather and the beautiful boats have attracted a lot of people onto the water. You do have to explain to the public who come out on the water how to respect the races. For next year, we’ll modify the race timetables so as the Modern yachts don’t arrive at Portalet just as the last Tradition yachts are setting sail…”

They were at Saint Tropez

The world of the sea, inshore racing and offshore racing traditionally come together at Les Voiles. At the helm of the most exquisite craft, calling tactics, on the manoeuvres, out on the rail and on the quaysides, sailing’s big names have flocked to the famous port in southern France’s Var region, with the noticeable presence, in this Vendée Globe year, of two competitors who will be at the start of the solo round the world race that sets sail on 6 November: Sébastien Josse and Sébastien Destremeau, as well as a former winner of the event, who will be in charge of security for the next edition: Alain Gautier. Other round the world sailors at the show have included Sébastien Audigane, South African Jan Dekker, Philippe Poupon and his actress wife Géraldine Danon, Philippe Monnet, Bruno and Loïck Peyron (also currently involved in the Artemis challenge for the next America’s Cup) Lionel Péan and also Volvo sailor Eric Peron.

There has also been a plethora of Figaro sailors, Mini sailors and members of other oceanic classes like Yannick Bestaven, Sébastien Rogues, Erwan Leroux, Nicolas Lunven and Armel Tripon,  There are sailors from the Olympics too… like Sofian Bouvet, (French 470 Team in Rio), Noé Delpech, (French 49er Team in Rio), Guillaume Florent, bronze Olympic Finn medallist in Beijing and German Jöchen Schümann, Olympic Finn and Soling champion, America’s Cup specialists, Marc Pajot, Bruno Troublé, Sébastien Col, American Tom Whidden and New Zealander Brad Butterworth, not to mention the royal racing aficionados such as HRH Juan Carlos, King of Spain, HRH Charles de Bourbon des Deux Siciles and Pierre Casiraghi, helmsman on the 15mJI Tuiga.

THE TROPHIES AT LES VOILES

Rolex Trophy: Moonbeam IV (Grand Tradition)

Edmond de Rothschild Group Trophy: TP 52 Team Vision (IRC C)

BMW Trophy: Open Season (Wally)

Kappa Trophy: Leopard (IRC A)

Pommery Trophy for the most beautiful spinnaker: Elena of London

YCF Trophy: Spartan

Byblos Trophy: Spartan (Period Gaff A)

Jetfly Trophy: Rowdy (Period Marconi A)

Euronews Trophy: Maria Giovanna II (Guest Class)

Mercantour Events Trophy: Yanira (Classic Marconi A)

Esprit Village Trophy: Cholita (Period Marconi C)

Tropheminin: Alibi

Les Marines de Cogolin Trophy: Team Chalets (IRC D)

SNSM Trophy: Absolutely (IRC E)

The results:

Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez plays host to 3 separate race ‘rounds’ for three large yachts categories; the Modern boats, the Tradition yachts and the Wallys. 5 groups of Modern yachts race in Saint Tropez, split into 5 categories governed by IRC. They’ve all validated 4 races this week.

IRC A Group

1- Leopard (Mini Maxi)

2- Velsheda (J Class)

3- S (VOR 70)

 

IRC B Group

1- Music (Baltic 50)

2- Music

3- Lazy Dog

 

IRC C Group (Edmond de Rothschild Trophy)

1- Team Vision Music (TP52)

2- Freccia Rossa (TP52)

3- Arobas (TP52)

 

IRC D Group

1- Team Chalets (A40)

2- Black Jack (J 113)

3- Wallis

 

IRC E Group

1- Absolutely (M 36)

2- Tchin (A35)

3- HEAT (Farr 30)

 

WALLY (BMW Trophy):

 

1- Open Season

2- Magic Carpet Cubed

 

WALLY 80

1 – J One

 

TRADITION 12 Groups gathering together all the classic yachts.

 

Classic Marconi Gaff Group: 7 entries

1- Yanira (Aas 1953)

2-Samarkand (Sparksman&Stephens 1958)

3- Eugenia V (Rhodes 1968)

 

Classic Marconi B Group

1- Outlaw (Illingworth 1963)

2- Argos (Holman 1964)

3- Fantasque (Mauric 1970)

 

12 m JI Fast-racer Group

1- Il Moro di Venezia (Frers 1976)

2- Ikra (Boyd 1964)

3- France (Mauric 1970)

 

Epoque Gaff Group

1- Spartan (Herreshoff 1912)

2- Olympian (Gardner 1913)

3- Chinook (Herreshoff 1916)

 

Epoque Gaff B Group

1- Kelpie of Falmouth (Sweisguth 1928)

2- Marigold  (Nicholson 1897)

3- Lulu (Rabot Caillebotte 1897)

 

Epoque Marconi A Group

1- Rowdy (Herreshoff 1916)

2- Enterprise (Olin Stevens 1940)

3- Seven seas of Porto (Clinton Crane 1935)

 

Epoque Marconi B Group

1-Leonore (Anker 1925)

2- Jour de Fête (Paine 1930)

3- Carron II (Fife 1935)

 

Epoque Marconi C Group

1- Cholita (Potter 1937)

2- Blitzen

3- Fjord III (Frers 1947)

 

Grand Tradition Group (Rolex Trophy)

1- Moonbeam IV (Fife 1914)

2- Moonbeam III (Fife 1903)

3- Halloween (Fife 1926)

 

Guest Class

1- Maria Giovanna II (Olin Stephens 1969)

2- Alibaba II

3- Dainty (Westmacott 1022)

 

Tofinou – 9 entries

1- Camomille – Jean Louis Nathan)

2- Black Legend (Christophe Delachaux)

3- Milou (Mario Schobinger)

Tofinou 9.5

1- Mynx – Guy Reynders

2- Pippa – Obe edward S. Fort

3- Pitch – Patrice Riboud

 

15 m JI

1- Mariska (Fife 1908)

2- The Lady Anne (Fife 1912)

3-Tuiga (Fife 1909)

4- Hispania (Fife 1909)

 

Partners to Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez

ROLEX

BMW GROUPE EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD WALLY KAPPA

HOTEL BYBLOS

MERCANTOUR EVENTS LES MARINES DE COGOLIN L’ESPRIT VILLAGE DE SAINT-TROPEZ

POMMERY

JETFLY

 

PROGRAMME

MODERN YACHTS

Saturday 24 September – Sunday 25: Registration and inspection

Monday 26, Tuesday 27, Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 (J. Laurain Day, Challenge Day), Friday 30 September and Saturday 1 October: Coastal course, 1st start 11:00am

 

CLASSIC YACHTS

Sunday 25 and Monday 26 September: Registration and inspection

Sunday 25 September: finish of the Yacht Club de France’s Coupe d’Automne from Cannes

Tuesday 27, Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 (J. Laurain Day, Challenge Day, Club 55 Cup, GYC Centenary Trophy), Friday 30 September and Saturday 1 October: Coastal course, 1st start 12:00 noon

 

Prize-giving for everyone

Sunday 2 October, from 11:00am

Organisation:

Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez, President: André Beaufils Principal Race Officer: Georges Korhel On the water organisation: Philippe Martinez On shore administration and logistics: Emmanuelle Filhastre Registration: Frédérique Fantino Communication: Chloé de Brouwer Website: www.lesvoilesdesaint-tropez.fr Facebook: Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez official Twitter: @VoilesSTOrg

Press Relations:

Maguelonne Turcat Photos:

Gilles Martin-Raget, www.martin-raget.com

Video: Guilain Grenier

 

 

ON S’EST DIT : « RENDEZ VOUS DANS UN AN ! »

13-com-vst16d5_0031

Voilà ! c’est fini ! près de 4 000 marins un peu groggy de tant de lumière, de tant d’excitantes régates, de tant de bonheur partagé à terre comme sur l’eau, peinaient aujourd’hui à réaliser que l’exceptionnelle édition des Voiles de Saint-Tropez 2016 s’achevait dans la douceur d’un dimanche d’automne. La remise des Prix traditionnellement organisée à la Citadelle de Saint-Tropez a donné lieu à un ultime moment de partage, plein de promesses de lendemains enchanteurs, ici même, dans un an. Un an à se remémorer les mille et un moments de bravoure de cette éblouissante semaine, des bords d’anthologie au contact de voiliers de légendes, dans l’écrin scintillant du golfe. Ils reviendront, plus convaincus que jamais du caractère unique des Voiles de Saint-Tropez, capables de réunir tant de marins d’horizons si différents dans une même communion d’esprit et d’humeur. Comme le souligne André Beaufils, Président heureux de la Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez, organisatrice de l’épreuve, ce sont eux, hommes de mer, skippers et propriétaires qui font l’événement, et prolongent édition après édition, le rêve des visionnaires créateurs voici 35 ans de la Nioulargue.

 

Ils ont dit :

André Beaufils, Président de la Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez

« C’est une édition qui s’inscrira dans les annales, au niveau de la météo bien entendu qui a été absolument fantastique, mais aussi au regard des contraintes qui nous étaient imposées cette année avec les travaux de la capitainerie, et leur incidence sur l’emplacement du village des Voiles, sans oublier les impératifs liés à la sécurité. On ne peut plus organiser un tel événement dans l’insouciance. Je suis ravi de cette semaine, tout comme l’ensemble des concurrents. C’est l’essentiel. Nos partenaires se sont déclarés heureux. La Municipalité de Saint-Tropez fait état de belles rencontres, notamment avec Tahiti, grâce aux Voiles. Le spectacle sur l’eau a été magnifique. Les media ont pu travailler dans des conditions optimums. Ces retours éminemment positifs constituent le salaire de tous nos bénévoles. Le village a plu, avec ses fenêtres en trompe l’oeil. On va conserver le concept en gagnant en largeur. Notre partenaire Rolex reviendra avec son espace hospitalité. On retrouvera ainsi l’entrée habituelle, mais avec des évolutions.

Comment mieux faire ? Je ne me pose pas la question. Je n’ai pas de record à battre. On a atteint un niveau qualitatif qui est en corrélation avec la manifestation. On peut modifier les choses en fonction des contraintes extérieures. Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez, c’est un peu l’auberge espagnole ; on y mange ce qu’on y amène ! Il n’y a pas d’enjeu à nos régates. L’esprit doit perdurer. On peut se permettre quelques excès, quelques coups de folie. Ce sont aux concurrents de créer cette folie. »

 

Georges Kohrel, Président du Comité de course

« Cette année, il est difficile de se montrer plus satisfait ! Quelle superbe semaine, avec de superbes conditions, de superbes régates ! On n’a pas eu de telles conditions depuis longtemps. Les équipes sur l’eau se connaissent parfaitement ; on effectue de petits ajustements, si nécessaire, afin qu’il n’y ait pas de rupture dans la chaine des compétences. Je n’ai aucun souci d’organisation vis à vis des trois comités de course, Modernes, Tradition et Wally. C’est la compétence de tous nos bénévoles sur l’eau qui permet de gérer ainsi simultanément trois ronds de course et 300 bateaux. Le beau temps et les beaux bateaux ont attiré beaucoup de monde sur l’eau. Il faut expliquer au public qui vient sur l’eau, comment respecter les régates. Pour l’année prochaine, on va modifier les horaires pour éviter que les rapides Modernes n’arrivent sous le Portalet au moment où les derniers Tradition prennent leur départ… »

 

Ils étaient à Saint-Tropez

Le monde de la mer, de la régate et de la course au large se donnent traditionnellement rendez-vous aux voiles. A la barre des plus belles unités, à la tactique, à la manœuvre, au rappel comme sur les quais, les plus grands noms de la voile sont présents dans le célèbre port varois et notamment, en cette année de Vendée Globe, deux concurrents qui seront au départ le 6 novembre : Sébastien Josse et Sébastien Destremeau, ainsi qu’un ancien vainqueur, qui sera responsable de la sécurité pour la prochaine édition : Alain Gautier. D’autres Tourdumondistes tels Sébastien Audigane, le Sud-Africain Jan Dekker, Philippe Poupon et son épouse l’actrice Géraldine Danon, Philippe Monnet, Bruno et Loïck Peyron (actuellement également dans le défi Artemis pour la prochaine America’s Cup) Lionel Péan ou Eric Peron.

Une palanquée de figaristes, ministes et autres classes océaniques comme Yannick Bestaven, Sébastien Rogues, Erwan Leroux, Nicolas Lunven, Armel Tripon, Des Olympiques… tels Sofian Bouvet, (équipe de France 470 Rio), Noé Delpech, (équipe de France 49er Rio), Guillaume Florent, médaillé olympique bronze Finn à Pékin ou l’Allemand Jöchen Schümann, champion olympique Finn et Soling, Des Spécialistes de la Coupe de l’America, Marc Pajot, Bruno Troublé, Sébastien Col, l’Americain Tom Whidden ou le Néo-zélandais Brad Butterworth, sans oublier les têtes couronnées passionnées de régate telles SAR Juan Carlos, roi d’Espagne, SAR Charles de Bourbon des Deux Siciles ou encore Pierre Casiraghi, barreur en titre du 15mJI Tuiga.

 

 

LES TROPHÉES DES VOILES

 

Trophée Rolex : Moonbeam IV (Grand Tradition)

Trophée Groupe Edmond de Rothschild : TP 52 Team Vision (IRC C)

Trophée BMW : Open Season (Wally)

Trophée Kappa : Leopard (IRC A)

Trophée Pommery du plus beau spi : Elena of London

Trophée YCF : Spartan

Trophée Byblos : Spartan (Epoque Aurique A)

Trophée Jetfly : Rowdy (Epoque Marconi A)

Trophée Euronews : Maria Giovanna II (Classe Invités)

Trophée Mercantour Events : Yanira (Classique Marconi A)

Trophée Esprit Village : Cholita (Epoque Marconi C)

Tropheminin : Alibi

Trophée les Marines de Cogolin : Team Chalets (IRC D)

Trophée SNSM : Absolutely (IRC E)

 

Les résultats :

 

Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez accueillent sur 3 « ronds » de course distincts trois grandes catégories de voiliers ; les bateaux Modernes, les yachts de Tradition, et les Wally.

5 Groupes de voiliers Modernes régatent à Saint-Tropez, répartis en 5 catégories régies par l’IRC. Ils ont tous validé 4 courses cette semaine.

 

 

 

Groupe IRC A

Ramblers 88 (George David) a longtemps mené les débats en alternance avec l’autre Mini Maxi, Leopard à Michael Slade. Les deux « avions de chasse » se sont jusqu’à vendredi partagé les victoires. C’est au final Leopard qui termine en trombe pour s’imposer. Lionel Péan place son VOR 70 « » sur le podium, fruit d’une belle régularité en temps réel. Il est devancé par l’immense ClassJ Velsheda pour la deuxième place.

 

Groupe IRC B

Le Baltic 50 Music (James Blackmore) s’impose grâce à deux belles victoires de manche. Il devance un homonyme, Music au Suisse Alba Batzill, et Lazy Dog de Sergio Sagramoso.

 

Groupe IRC C (Trophée Edmond de Rothschild)

Ce groupe hautement compétitif rassemble de redoutables racers de 50 et 52 pieds. les TP 52 Freccia Rossa au Russe vadim yakimenko et team Vision (Jean jacques Chaubard) y règnent en Maitre avec le plan Botin Arobas de gérard Logel en embuscade. C’est finalement et de haute lutte Team Vision qui s’impose devant les russes de Vadim Yakimenko.

 

Groupe IRC D

L’A 40 Team Chalets (Philippe Saint André) écrase littéralement la concurrence avec deux victoires de manche. Le J 133 Black Jack (Eric Gicquel) s’accroche à la deuxième place et tient à distance Wallis de Frédéric Bouillon.

 

Groupe IRC E

Groupe très dense avec pas moins de 36 engagés. Le M 36 Absolutely de Philippe Frantz rafle tout sur son passage. Le A 35 Tchin (Jean Claude bertrand) et HEAT, le farr 30 de max Augustin complètent dans cet ordre le podium.

 

 

WALLY (Trophée BMW) :

 

16 Wally, un record, étaient cette année engagés aux Voiles. Ils ont validé 6 courses au large de Pampelonne.

Michael Atkinson et son Open Season s’imposent après moult rebondissements, lors de la dernière journée, « chipant » le titre à l’habitué des victoires Magic Carpet Cubed de Sir Lindsay Owen Jones. Le 80 pieds J One barré par Piers Richardson monte sur le podium et empoche le classement des 80 pieds, dont 6 unités régataient au sein de ce groupe.

 

TRADITION 12 Groupes rassemblent l’ensemble des voiliers de tradition.

 

Groupe Classique Marconi Aurique : 7 inscrits

1- Yanira (Aas 1953)

2-Samarkand «5Sparksman&Stephens 1958)

3- Eugenia V (Rhodes 1968

 

Groupe Classique Marconi B

1- Outlaw (Illingworth 1963)

2- Argos (Holman 1964)

3- fantasque (Mauric 1970)

 

Groupe racer – rapides 12 m JI

1- Il Moro di Venezia (Frers 1976)

2- Ikra (Boyd 1964)

3- France (Mauric 1970)

 

Groupe Epoque Aurique

1- Spartan (Herreshoff 1912)

2- Olympian (Gardner 1913)

3- Chinook (Herreshoff 1916)

 

Groupe Epoque Aurique B

1- Kelpie of Falmouth (Sweisguth 1928)

2- Marigold (Nicholson 1897)

3- Lulu (Rabot Caillebotte 1897)

 

Groupe Epoque Marconi A

1- Rowdy (Herreshoff 1916)

2- Enterprise (Olin Stevens 1940)

3- Seven seas of Porto (Clinton Crane 1935)

 

Groupe Epoque Marconi B

1-Leonore (Anker 1925)

2- Jour de Fête (Paine 1930)

3- Carron II (Fife 1935)

 

Groupe Epoque Marconi C

1- Cholita (Potter 1937)

2- Blitzen

3- Fjord III (Frers 1947)

 

Groupe Grand Tradition (Trophée Rolex)

1- Moonbeam IV (Fife 1914)

2- Moonbeam III (Fife 1903)

3- Halloween (Fife 1926)

 

Classe Invités

1- Maria Giovanna II (Olin Stephens 1969)

2- Alibaba II

3- Dainty (Westmacott 1022)

 

Tofinou – 9 inscrits

1- Camomille – Jean Louis Nathan)

2- Black Legend (Christophe Delachaux)

3- Milou (Mario Schobinger)

 

Tofinou 9,5

1- Mynx – Guy Reynders

2- Pippa – Obe edward S. Fort

3_ Pitch – Patrice Riboud

 

15 m JI

1- Mariska (Fife 1908)

2- The lady Anne (Fife 1912)

3-Tuiga (Fife 1909)

4- Hispania (Fife 1909)

 

 

Partenaires des Voiles de Saint-Tropez ROLEX

BMW GROUPE EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD WALLY KAPPA

HOTEL BYBLOS

MERCANTOUR EVENTS LES MARINES DE COGOLIN L’ESPRIT VILLAGE DE SAINT-TROPEZ

POMMERY

JETFLY

 

Organisation :

Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez, Président : André Beaufils Principal Race Officer : Georges Korhel Moyens sur l’eau : Philippe Martinez Administration et coordination logistique à terre : Emmanuelle Filhastre Inscriptions : Frédérique Fantino

Rédaction : Denis van den Brink Communication : Chloé de Brouwer

Site internet : www.lesvoilesdesaint-tropez.fr

Facebook : les Voiles de Saint-Tropez officiel

Twitter : @VoilesSTOrg

 

 

Relations Presse :

Maguelonne Turcat Tel 06 09 95 58 91 E-mail magturcat@gmail.com

 

Photos :

Gilles Martin-Raget, www.martin-raget.com

 

Production video :

GMR+G1 , Guilain Grenier

 

 

 

SAINT TROPEZ CROWNS ITS CHAMPIONS

01/10/2016, Saint-Tropez (FRA,83), Voiles de Saint-Tropez 2016, Day 6

One last hotly-contested race for all the competing groups
Fine champions, Moonbeam 4, Leopard and Spartan
The low-down on the Trophy winners…

Already tinged with nostalgia, there was still everything to play for among a number of the Modern and Classic yacht crews in today’s final day of racing in what has been an exceptional edition of Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez. Indeed, victory in Saint Tropez is increasingly cherished by the racers, as are the specific Trophies, which notably reward the winners of the Grand Tradition (Rolex Trophy) and Wally (BMW Trophy) categories as well as IRC C (Edmond de Rothschild Group Trophy). Though a light cloud veiled the sun this Saturday for the first time in 6 days of racing, the wind had just enough puff left to enable the final races to be run from Pampelonne to Les Issambres and the integration of a final course was eagerly devoured by all the competitors. In this way, some 4,000 sailors, skippers and owners will tomorrow celebrate the winners in what has been an action-packed week embellished by sunshine and friendship. Freccia Rossa (TP 52), Open Season (Wally), Moonbeam IV (Grand Tradition), Spartan (Epoque Aurique) and Rowdy (Epoque marconi) are among the big players who will leave the little port in southern France’s Var region with renewed pride, eager to repeat their performances at next year’s edition of Les Voiles de Saint Tropez.

 

Full house

The summer just seems to go on forever in Saint Tropez. The skippers of 300 of the most beautiful Modern and Classic yachts in the world have enjoyed every minute of it, united in the eternal spirit of yachting, just as Patrice de Colmont imagined in 1981. The glorious sunshine and good breeze have enabled nearly all the races to be run in and around the bay, where 4,000 sailors from over 20 countries have relished the camaraderie and the festivities both on land and at sea. With 6 races validated off Pampelonne, the Wally’s have contested the greatest number of races, alternating between windward-leeward and coastal courses. Split into 5 IRC groups, the Modern boats managed to rack up four races, as did the Classic yachts.

 

The big prizes at Les Voiles:

Rolex: Moonbeam IV

Mickael Créac’h, boat captain and skipper of Moonbeam IV, at the top of the leaderboard after the first three races, was still dreading this last day of racing, which was forecast to be rainy with little breeze. Fortunately, a light S’ly breeze enabled the Race Committee to launch a short, technical sprint at the given time bound for Les Issambres. With Moonbeam IV fully powered up out of the starting blocks, to windward of the massive schooner Elena of London, she rounded off her week in style, leaving the rest of the fleet in her wake to take victory in the 13-mile race. And so it is that the much coveted Rolex Trophy goes to the big Moonbeam (Fife 1914). The eldest of the Moonbeams, the No.3, otherwise known as Moonbeam of Fife (1903), secured a splendid second place, alongside the large Bermudan cutter, Halloween (1926), she too a Fife.

 

BMW Trophy: Open Season

Dominating play with two superb victories and one 2nd place during the windward-leewards, the crew on the Wally 107 Open Season were fearful of the coastal race lined up for this final day. Indeed, in this the 6th race of the week for Luca Bassani’s designs, Magic Carpet Cubed was the race favourite after an impressively consistent performance round the cans and offshore. However, in today’s medium breeze off Pampelonne, Michael Atkinson was a surprise victor on Open Season. Magic Carpet Cubed and Sir Lindsay Owen Jones took second place, while Piers Richardson and J One scored a very fine 3rd place, just pipping Tango to the post.

 

Edmond de Rothschild Group Trophy: TP 52 Team Vision.

A battle royal reigned in this category with just one point separating the Russians on the TP 52 Frescia Rossa led by Vadim Yakimenko and the French on Team Vision skippered by Jean Jacques Chaubard on the eve of the final day of racing. Both gave their absolute all today but ultimately the French crew just did enough to take home the Edmond de Rothschild Trophy. Arobas, the Botin design, earned a much deserved third place in an extremely tough line-up of 24 boats.

 

Trouble among the Modern big boys.

Though the hierarchy for this very elite group of large Modern yachts may have originally seemed like a foregone conclusion, throughout the past week it has been turned on its head thanks to the excellent performances posted by the challengers and the medium conditions, which have left no room for error. The 100-foot Farr design Leopard did manage to live up to expectations despite a blip on Wednesday, but her companions on the podium are somewhat unexpected: Velsheda, the 1933 J Class got the better of the other giant in her category, Lionheart (Hoek 2010) and ended up just one point behind Leopard. Logically Rambler88 was a big contender for third place, but it’s Lionel Péan’s VOR 70 S that takes it after a great week despite her disastrous rating.

 

A yacht of distinction: Mignon

Mignon was built in 1905 in Norway to race in the 7 M JI category, a class with few takers that quickly disappeared. She’s a 16m45 wooden sloop designed by August Plym. Originally gaff rigged, the boat was transformed into a 7/8 Marconi back in 1911. The first owner was an English captain and the boat was based in the Solent. After a string of different owners and ports of registry, she was restored in Italy and then, more recently, Marseille, and has just started racing in the Mediterranean. Her name harks back to an enigmatic Goethe character familiar to Ambroise Thomas and Richard Wagner operas.

 

Kilroy was here!

The late lamented John “Jim” Kilroy, owner of the Kialoa Maxi Yacht saga, who sadly died on Thursday and was a great force at Les Voiles, adopted a strange maxim that decorated the transom of all his Kialoa Maxis. “Kilroy was here” depicted a bald-headed man with a prominent nose peeking over a wall. Commonplace worldwide, in WWII it was used by the GIs to lay claim to supposedly new territories and is accredited to an American metallurgist, he too known by the name of James Kilroy, who used it to mark the spaces on the ships that he’d inspected at the Fore River Shipyard in Quincy, Massachusetts.

 

Today’s partners:

Byblos

Saint Tropez’ palace partners Les Voiles every year without fail. Nestled between the Citadel and the Place des Lices square, Hotel Byblos opens its doors from April to October to the great delight of its guests who come from all over the world. The colours of the Mediterranean are conveyed in the hotel’s 91 rooms and suites. The establishment boasts a Spa by Sisley Cosmetics, a restaurant beside the pool, a gym, a treatment centre and a night club, among its many other excellent services. Its restaurant “Rivea at Byblos” offers authentic cuisine from top chef Alain Ducasse, which sublimates the products of Provence and Italy. A charming hotel for a decadent stay in Saint Tropez, the Byblos also hosts tailored events, weddings, receptions and conferences.

 

Jetfly

A new addition to Les Voiles’ partners’ club, Jetfly provides flights for business and private users. Jetfly manages Europe’s largest fleet of PC 12s, small business planes able to take off and land on relatively short runways. The planes operate on a joint-ownership basis and are readily available to the joint owners, which is why there are a number of them in and around Saint Tropez. “This is why we were keen to approach Les Voiles,” explains Cédric Lescope, CEO of Jetfly, “as a number of our joint-owners sail here year-round. Since the start of the year, we’ve landed at Saint Tropez airport over 500 times. Moreover, 8 of our planes are on stand-by in Saint Tropez throughout Les Voiles, at the disposal of our clients and owners…”

 

 

Partners to Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez

ROLEX

BMW GROUPE EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD WALLY KAPPA

HOTEL BYBLOS

MERCANTOUR EVENTS LES MARINES DE COGOLIN L’ESPRIT VILLAGE DE SAINT-TROPEZ

POMMERY

JETFLY

 

 

PROGRAMME

MODERN YACHTS

Saturday 24 September – Sunday 25: Registration and inspection

Monday 26, Tuesday 27, Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 (J. Laurain Day, Challenge Day), Friday 30 September and Saturday 1 October: Coastal course, 1st start 11:00am

 

CLASSIC YACHTS

Sunday 25 and Monday 26 September: Registration and inspection

Sunday 25 September: finish of the Yacht Club de France’s Coupe d’Automne from Cannes

Tuesday 27, Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 (J. Laurain Day, Challenge Day, Club 55 Cup, GYC Centenary Trophy), Friday 30 September and Saturday 1 October: Coastal course, 1st start 12:00 noon

 

Prize-giving for everyone

Sunday 2 October, from 11:00am

Organisation:

Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez, President: André Beaufils Principal Race Officer: Georges Korhel On the water organisation: Philippe Martinez On shore administration and logistics: Emmanuelle Filhastre Registration: Frédérique Fantino Communication: Chloé de Brouwer Website: www.lesvoilesdesaint-tropez.fr Facebook: Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez official Twitter: @VoilesSTOrg

 

Press Relations:

Maguelonne Turcat Photos:

Gilles Martin-Raget, www.martin-raget.com

 

SAINT-TROPEZ SACRE SES ROIS

01/10/2016, Saint-Tropez (FRA,83), Voiles de Saint-Tropez 2016, Day 6

Nouvelle manche très disputée pour tous les groupes en lice
De beaux champions, Moonbeam 4, Leopard, Spartan
Les vainqueurs des Trophées connus…

Déjà empreinte de nostalgie, la dernière journée de régate d’une exceptionnelle édition des Voiles de Saint-Tropez revêtait pourtant, et pour nombre de voiliers tant Modernes que Classiques, un vif intérêt sportif. La victoire à Saint-Tropez est en effet de plus en plus prisée des régatiers, tout comme les Trophées spécifiques qui récompensent notamment les vainqueurs en catégorie Grand Tradition (Trophée Rolex), Wally (Trophée BMW) ou le meilleur en IRC C (Trophée Groupe Edmond de Rothschild). Et si le ciel s’était ce matin quelque peu voilé, après avoir 6 jours durant inondé de bleu le golfe aux étoiles, le vent avait conservé juste assez de pression pour permettre de Pampelonne aux Issambres, les mises en place d’un ultime parcours dévoré avec appétit par tous les concurrents. 4 000 marins, skippers et propriétaires célébreront ainsi demain dimanche les lauréats d’une semaine comblée d’action, de soleil et d’amitié ; les Freccia Rossa (TP 52), Open Season (Wally), Moonbeam IV (Grand Tradition), Spartan (Epoque Aurique) ou Rowdy (Epoque marconi) et consorts quitteront le petit port Varois avec plus qu’une nouvelle ligne à leur palmarès déjà si riche, mais avec cette part de légende qui renait chaque année à Saint-Tropez aux derniers jours de l’été.

Carton plein

L’été ne veut décidément pas mourir à Saint-Tropez. Il a toute la semaine choisit d’exaucer de ses faveurs 300 des plus beaux yachts Modernes et Classiques, unis dans l’esprit éternel du yachting, tel que Patrice de Colmont l’a imaginé en 1981. Généreux et chaud soleil, vent suffisamment établi en force et direction pour permettre la validation de quasiment toutes les manches lancées dans et en bordure du golfe, ont constitué le quotidien en mer des 4 000 marins venus de plus de 20 pays, et qui ont trouvé à terre la fraternité si particulière des gens de mer pour communier dans la plus joyeuse des fêtes. Avec 6 courses validées, ce sont les Wally qui, au large de Pampelonne, et en alternant parcours bananes et côtiers, auront disputé le plus de manches. Quatre courses au bilan des voiliers Modernes répartis en 5 groupes IRC, tandis que les yachts classiques entrés, et c’est la tradition, plus tard dans la sarabande, affichent également quatre courses au tableau. On l’a compris, les vainqueurs de la semaine, dans les 12 catégories classiques, 5 groupes IRC et Groupe Wally, n’ont en rien usurpé leurs titres.

Les Grands Trophées des Voiles :

Rolex : Moonbeam IV

Mickael Créac’h, boat captain et skipper de Moonbeam IV, en tête à l’issue des trois premières courses, redoutait pourtant cette dernière journée de régate annoncée sous l’influence d’un temps pluvieux et peu venté. Que nenni ! Un léger flux de secteur sud est permettait au Comité de course d’envoyer à l’heure prévue une manche voulue courte et technique en direction des Issambres. Et Moonbeam IV, bien lancé dès le départ au vent de l’immense goélette Elena of London paraphait de la meilleure des manières sa belle semaine en s’imposant au terme d’un joli parcours d’environ 13 milles. Une victoire qui scellait l’attribution du très convoitée Trophée Rolex et récompensait le grand Moonbeam (Fife 1914). L’ainé des Moonbeam, le N°3 aussi connu sous le nom de Moonbeam of Fife (1903) fait un splendide deuxième, aux côtés du grand cotre Bermudien lui aussi signé Fife, Halloween (1926).

Trophée BMW ; Open Season

Dominateur avec deux belles victoires et une place de 2 lors des parcours construits dits bananes, le Wally 107 Open Season redoutait la course côtière programmée pour l’ultime journée. Cette 6ème course de la semaine pour les magnifiques yachts chers à Luca Bassani semblait en effet promise à Magic Carpet cubed, impressionnant de régularité tant entre trois bouées, qu’au large. Dans le temps medium qui a régné aujourd’hui du côté de Pampelonne, c’est Michael Atkinson qui a su tirer son épingle du jeu et placer Open Season en tête des classements. Magic Carpet3 et Sir Lindsay Owen Jones prennent la deuxième place tandis que Piers Richardson et J One signent une très belle 3ème place au nez et à la barbe de Tango.

Trophée Groupe Edmond de Rothschild ; TP 52 Team Vision.

C’est à une véritable finale que se sont livrés les Russes du TP 52 Frescia Rossa face aux français de Team Vision, séparés à la veille de l’ultime manche de la semaine par un seul petit point. Les équipages se sont donnés à fond et les Russes de Vadim Yakimenko ont du s’incliner face aux marins de Jean Jacques Chaubard qui s’adjugent donc le Trophée Edmond de Rothschild. Arobas, le plan Botin est un très valeureux troisième d’un groupe extrêmement relevé de pas moins de 24 bateaux. On soulignera la belle 6ème place de l’un des trois Swan 50 en lice, celui de Leonardo Ferragamo sur Cuordileone.

Du rififi chez les grands Modernes.

Si la hiérarchie du très élitiste groupe des Grands Modernes semblait, au regard du plateau présenté, quelque peu déjà écrite, elle a tout au long de la semaine été bousculée par l’excellence des challengers, et par des conditions météos médium qui ne laissaient que peu de marge à l’erreur. Certes, la « luge » de 100 pieds signée Farr Leopard s’impose malgré son faux pas de mercredi, mais ses assesseurs sur le podium sont quelque peu inattendus : Velsheda, le J Class de 1933 dame le pion à l’autre géant de sa catégorie, la réplique Lionheart (Hoek 2010) et vient échouer d’un petit point derrière Leopard. Et là où l’on attendait fort logiquement « l’ogre » Rambler88, c’est le VOR 70 S de Lionel Péan qui monte sur le podium au terme d’une belle semaine qui l’a vu gommer les effets de son désastreux rating.

Yacht Extra – ordinaire : Mignon

Mignon  a été construit en 1905 en Norvège, pour régater dans la catégorie des 7 mètres de jauge internationale, une classe qui n’a compté que très peu de bateaux et a rapidement disparu. Il s’agit d’un sloop de 16m45 en bois sur plans August Plym. Originalement gréé en Aurique, le bateau a été transformé en Marconi 7/8 dès 1911.

Le premier propriétaire était un capitaine anglais et le bateau était basé dans le Solent. Il a ensuite changé plusieurs fois de propriétaire et de port. Il a été restauré en Italie puis, plus récemment, à Marseille. Il participe depuis peu, aux régates Méditeranéennes. Le nom viendrait d’un personnage énigmatique de Goethe, qu’on retrouve dans des opéras d’Ambroise Thomas et de Richard Wagner.

 

Le saviez vous ?

Le voilier de classe J, Velsheda a été conçu par Charles Ernest Nicholson et construit en 1933 par le chantier Camper and Nicholsons à Gosport, Hampshire. Extrême comme tous les Class J, il mesure 39,40 mètres hors tout pour un maître-bau de 6,60 mètres, un tirant d’eau de 4,80 mètres. Il a été construit pour l’homme d’affaires William Stephenson-Laurent, propriétaire de la chaîne de magasins Woolworth qui le nomma ainsi en contractant les trois premières syllabes des prénoms de ses filles : Velma, Sheila and Daphne. Entre 1933 et 1936, il a remporté de nombreuses courses et a participé, avec d’autres grands yachts tels que Britannia, Endeavour et Shamrock V, à de nombreuses régates entre 1933 et 1936. Pourtant, et malgré sa conception, il ne participa pas à la mythique Coupe de l’America.

 

Coups de canon royaux

Hispania, l’élégant cotre aurique de la Classe des 15 m JI salue chaque jour à Saint-Tropez son entrée et sa sortie du port de deux coups de canons ; un privilège hérité sans doute de son commanditaire du siècle dernier, le roi Alphonse XIII, le monarque navigateur. Un clin d’oeil peut-être aussi à la discrète présence aux Voiles cette semaine de SAR Juan Carlos…

 

Kilroy was here !

Le déjà très regretté John « Jim » Kilroy, propriétaire de la saga des Maxis Yachts Kialoa, décédé avant hier, avait fait sienne une étrange maxime qui ornait le tableau arrière de ses Maxis Kialoa, « Kilroy was here », orné d’un dessin représentant un demi visage avec un gros nez. L’origine de ce graffiti que l’on retrouve aux quatre coins du monde, adoptée durant la seconde guerre mondiale par tous les GIs qui le griffonnaient au hasard de leurs pérégrinations, est imputable à un ouvrier métallurgiste américain du nom de James Kilroy. James travaillait à la construction de bateaux et était inspecteur au Fore River Shipyard de Quincy dans le Massachussetts. Il comptait les rivets fixés sur les coques de bateaux et marquait d’une croix les espaces inspectés. Mais les poseurs de rivets (Riveters) étaient à l’époque payés au rivet posé. Ils repassaient ainsi derrière James et effaçaient ses marques. L’inspecteur suivant plaçait une nouvelle coche et les riveter étaient payés deux fois. C’est pour contrer ces manoeuvres que James Kilroy décida de signer ses interventions de  « Kilroy was here », preuve de son passage, qu’il ornait du petit dessin, et que l’on retrouve ainsi, clin d’oeil à son homonyme, sur les bateaux de John Kilroy.

 

Les partenaires du jour :

Byblos

Le palace tropézien est un partenaire indéfectible des Voiles. Niché entre la Citadelle et la Place des Lices, l’hôtel Byblos ouvre d’avril à octobre pour le plus grand plaisir de ses hôtes venant du monde entier. Les couleurs de la Méditerranée se retrouvent dans les 91 chambres et suites de l’hôtel. Le Palace tropézien dispose d’un Spa by Sisley Cosmetics, d’un restaurant en bord piscine, le « B. », d’une salle de fitness, d’un centre de soins d’endermologie LPG, d’un service de conciergerie « Clefs d’Or » 24h/24 et du night-club « Les Caves du Roy ». Son restaurant « Rivea at Byblos » by Alain Ducasse propose une cuisine authentique sublimant les produits issus des terroirs de la Provence et de l’Italie. Hôtel de charme pour des séjours d’exception sur la Côte d’Azur, le Byblos organise également des évènements sur mesure, mariages, réceptions, incentives ou encore séminaires.

 

Jetfly

Nouvelle venue parmi les partenaires des Voiles, la société Jetfly assure des vols d’affaires, mais aussi privés. Jetfly gère la plus grande flotte de PC 12 en Europe, petits avions d’affaire capables de se poser et de décoller de pistes relativement courtes. Les avions fonctionnent sur la base de la co-propriété, et sont rapidement à disposition des co-propriétaires. Ils sont ainsi un certain nombre résidant autour de Saint-Tropez. « C’est pourquoi que nous avons souhaité nous rapprocher des Voiles, » explique Cédric Lescope, PDG de Jetfly, « car nombre de nos co-propriétaires naviguent ici à l’année. Nous avons depuis le début de l’année assuré plus de 500 atterrissages sur l’aéroport de Saint-Tropez. 8 de nos avions sont par ailleurs en stand by à Saint-Tropez durant les Voiles, à la disposition de nos client et propriétaires… »

 

 

Partenaires des Voiles de Saint-Tropez ROLEX

BMW GROUPE EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD WALLY KAPPA

HOTEL BYBLOS

MERCANTOUR EVENTS LES MARINES DE COGOLIN L’ESPRIT VILLAGE DE SAINT-TROPEZ

POMMERY

JETFLY

 

PROGRAMME

Pour tout le monde remise des prix

Dimanche 2 Octobre, à partir de 11 heures

Organisation :

Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez, Président : André Beaufils Principal Race Officer : Georges Korhel Moyens sur l’eau : Philippe Martinez Administration et coordination logistique à terre : Emmanuelle Filhastre Inscriptions : Frédérique Fantino

Rédaction : Denis van den Brink Communication : Chloé de Brouwer

Site internet : www.lesvoilesdesaint-tropez.fr

Facebook : les Voiles de Saint-Tropez officiel

Twitter : @VoilesSTOrg

Relations Presse :

Maguelonne Turcat
Photos :

Gilles Martin-Raget, www.martin-raget.com

 

Production video :

GMR+G1 , Guilain Grenier

 

ALWAYS A NOTCH HIGHER…

30/09/2016, Saint-Tropez (FRA,83), Voiles de Saint-Tropez 2016, Day 5

–  The finest day of Les Voiles so far…

–  15 m JI: Mariska already a champion!

–  Wally: Tango on the podium!

 

Another notch higher. Every day of this 2016 edition of Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez, has seen the elements come together to create a theatre graced by a little more sunshine and a little more breeze, with just a little more salt spray in which the 300 Modern and Classic yachts can push the sport and elegance angle a notch higher. With 12 to 15 knots of SW’ly wind nicely settled into position from noon, this 5th day of Les Voiles came to a head to produce a spectacle to bedazzle even the most blasé of racers. From the 16 Wallys bristling with all sails aloft for a black flag start, to the Maxis and Mini Maxis powered up on a beat towards Cavalaire or classic yachts with everything flying and fully canted over to sprint to the other side of the bay, close-hauled in a great mass of foam, all the competing classes reaped the benefits of the exceptional conditions to really show what they were made of.

 

Mariska owns the racetrack

Yesterday was a glamour day for Christian Niels and his crew on the 15 m JI Mariska (Fife 1908). Battling it out to take home the 2016 title, Thursday’s Challenge Day saw them stamp their supremacy on the competition by dominating the three races run. “We got off to some good starts,” explains helmsman Sébastien Audigane. “We covered Tuiga during the first race, then The Lady Anne. It involved a lot of action and manœuvres but ultimately it was a sumptuous day, which virtually guaranteed us the 2016 championship. The icing on the cake would be to win the overall ranking at Les Voiles here in Saint Tropez.”

Back racing with the rest of the fleet today, the 15 m JIs were the last group to set sail with the SW’ly wind on the beam towards Saint-Raphael, powered up on a long and highly technical 19-mile triangular course, pushed along by almost 20 knots of breeze! It was the performance of Tuiga that stood out ahead of Hispania, with Mariska nailing 3rd place ahead of The Lady Anne. On the eve of the final day of racing, Mariska is two points ahead of The Lady Anne in the overall ranking, with 5 points on Tuiga.

 

Wallys champing at the bit

The 16 Wallys competing at Les Voiles were offered two windward-leeward courses today. There impatience to get going after yesterday’s rest day (the Wallys don’t participate in the Challenges) was palpable. Two general recalls later, the Race Committee for the Wallys logically decided to apply the black flag rule, which translates as an immediate elimination for any boats overshooting the start. Open Season, the 2012 Wally 107 pulled off the day’s grand slam with two victories which, on the eve of the final day of racing, sees her propelled into the lead of the overall ranking. Less fortunate, Magic Carpet Cubed is now 3 points shy of the top spot. Meantime, Tango G, the ‘little’ 80-footer, pulled a blinder this Friday, moving up onto the podium with a 3-point lead over the other 80-footer (24 metres) Lyra.

 

Tofinous, Code 0, Code 1

Within the fleet of Classic yachts and on the same courses as the prestigious period and tradition yachts, there are some truly elegant dayboats racing in Saint Tropez. Measuring 7m, 8m or 9.50m in length, the Tofinou 12 or 9.50 designed by Joubert/Nivelt, and other Code 0 and Code 1s (Neyhousser) are split into two distinct groups at Les Voiles, according to their size. In this way, the Tofinou 12 Milou is leading proceedings in the longer carbon-rigged craft, ahead of Camomille and the Code 1 Black Legend. Edward Fort’s Pippa is in pole position in the Tofinou 9.50s, ahead of Patrice Ribaud and his Pitch and Guy Reynier on Minx.

 

A yacht of distinction: Enterprise

The very pretty Marconi yawl Enterprise is now sailing in the Mediterranean. Launched in 1939 by Robert Jacob from City Island, New York, the 60-footer (18.28m) Clemencia, was renamed Adios after the war when she moved to America’s western seaboard. Enterprise enjoyed an illustrious sporting career there, winning countless races in the Pacific. Enterprise has a number of features in common with the Olin Stephens designs, penned and built by Sparkman and Stephens, with her very balanced and very straight lines and her flush deck. Built of oak, she also sports a mahogany veneer.

Ten Metre Class

Marga is putting in her first Mediterranean tacks in Saint Tropez. The pretty gaff rig designed by Liljegren (1910) is in reality a 10 Metre. The International 10 Metre Class is a ‘box rule’ enabling different boats to be built, but adhering to a specific measurement rule in contrast to the International Measurement. In their day such boats formed the largest and most important group in international yachting. We still find them today on every race zone in the world. The number ‘10’ is somewhat deceptive as it does not refer to the length of the boat, which actually equates to around 16.50 metres.

In the last century, each maritime nation had its own measurement: the French spoke of the “Tonneaux”, the Americans the “Universal Rule”, the Swiss the “Godinet” measurement, the Germans the “Sonderklasse”, the Scandinavians the “fin-keels” and the British the “Second Linear Rating Rule”…

In this way, eight Metre Classes have been retained (5m JI, 6m JI, 7m JI, 8m JI, 10m JI, 12m JI, 15m JI, 19m JI) to which we must add the 23m JI inspired by the America’s Cup. Just six boats satisfying this latter rule were built between 1907 and 1929 (Brynhild II, White Heather II, Shamrock III, Astra, Cambria, Candida). The 10 m R Class was the designated craft for the Olympic Games from 1912 to 1920.

 

Jim Kilroy still with us in spirit

The American John B. “Jim” Kilroy died yesterday, 29 September at 94 years of age. A great friend of the Nioulargue, his was a familiar face aboard his Kialoa Maxis. He will go down in the history of yachting as one of the great promoters of the Maxi Yachts. He went on to own 5 yachts by the name of Kialoa, with which he won a number of major classic races, notably in the Pacific, with a resounding victory in the Sydney-Hobart in 1975. Kialoa means “swift, fast canoe”. Patrice de Colmont fondly recalls a gentleman who, after an epic trip to the Bahamas, he managed to persuade to come to the Nioulargue in 1985: “Jim was a grand gentleman, who saluted the Committee at the end of each race. With regards the Nioulargue, people said to me: Patrice, so long as Jim Kilroy’s not at your race, it doesn’t amount to a hill of beans!” I spent a fortune but I tailed Jim as far as Nassau to speak to him about Saint Tropez. He thought it was in Italy! He confirmed that he would come along on one condition: that I made out a cheque for the young racers in my region. He came along with not one, but two Kialoas. However, from the first race, a zone of calm settled over the race zone and not one yacht could race. So we launched “a white wine warning”, which saw some lovely young ladies going from boat to boat distributing champagne. Back in port, Jim said to me: “I’ll be the one signing the cheque…”

Today’s partner: WALLY

Meeting the future head on

16 Wallys are sailing at Les Voiles on a specially dedicated round off the beach at Pampelonne. Two new craft are catching spectators’ eyes this year; the massive 55m Better Place and the new Wally Cento Galateia.

Created from the imagination and desire of an experienced yachtsman, Italian Luca Bassani, the Wally perfectly fulfil the criteria that guided the pencils of the greats from naval architecture including Fife and Herrreshoff; namely performance, elegance, design, simplicity and comfort. In imagining the Wallys, Luca Bassani was keen to be able to manoeuvre his large yacht shorthanded or even singlehanded, using cutting edge technologies to make the yacht simpler, easier and more fun. And so the Wallys came into existence, combining the iconic style of this brand with waterlines penned by the world’s best naval architects. In this way, over 40 yachts, measuring 20 to 50 metres, have been created using this philosophy. Today, the Wally Class division is the largest super yacht racing fleet in the world. Wally has also taken giant leaps into the world of high performance motor boats with its launch of the « Wallypower » range and the spacious “Wallyace” range. Over the years, Wally has become a loyal partner to Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez by providing a spirit of continuity in a milieu that is constantly challenging technological innovation alongside truly legendary yachts.

Partners to Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez

ROLEX

BMW GROUPE EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD WALLY KAPPA

HOTEL BYBLOS

MERCANTOUR EVENTS LES MARINES DE COGOLIN L’ESPRIT VILLAGE DE SAINT-TROPEZ

POMMERY

JETFLY

 

 

PROGRAMME

MODERN YACHTS

Saturday 24 September – Sunday 25: Registration and inspection

Monday 26, Tuesday 27, Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 (J. Laurain Day, Challenge Day), Friday 30 September and Saturday 1 October: Coastal course, 1st start 11:00am

 

CLASSIC YACHTS

Sunday 25 and Monday 26 September: Registration and inspection

Sunday 25 September: finish of the Yacht Club de France’s Coupe d’Automne from Cannes

Tuesday 27, Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 (J. Laurain Day, Challenge Day, Club 55 Cup, GYC Centenary Trophy), Friday 30 September and Saturday 1 October: Coastal course, 1st start 12:00 noon

 

Prize-giving for everyone

Sunday 2 October, from 11:00am

Organisation:

Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez, President: André Beaufils Principal Race Officer: Georges Korhel On the water organisation: Philippe Martinez On shore administration and logistics: Emmanuelle Filhastre Registration: Frédérique Fantino Communication: Chloé de Brouwer Website: www.lesvoilesdesaint-tropez.fr Facebook: Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez official Twitter: @VoilesSTOrg

Press Relations:

Maguelonne Turcat

Photos:

Gilles Martin-Raget, www.martin-raget.com